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Unrepeatable breeders are out there

Don't fall victim to the unrepeatable breeders - they are out there.

Sadly, there has been a significant rise in the number of farmed puppies presenting at the surgery with various problems. The rise is so marked that I wish to bring it to your attention.

Together, we can put a stop to this brutal trade.

Farmed puppies are bred in large numbers solely for profit, often with little regard for their welfare. As a result, they tend to have health problems; infectious gastrointestinal disease, some congenital problems and behavioural issues due to poor socialisation. These are all unnecessary and preventable problems – you can help.

Help us to put puppy farms out of business

When you are considering to buy a puppy, follow these simple steps on the spiral ladder to success;

Social / Behaviour

Spend time watching how the puppies interact with each other & the mother.

Premises / Environment

See the mother with her pups where they were born, father too is preferable but a photo at least will do. Are the premises clean & tidy, enough food & water?

Injections

Check the documentation, they can be easy to fake. There should be a veterinary stamp on it, check it out.

Report Suspicions to RSPCA/Authorities

Any suspicions, or evidence of cruelty. please report to the RSPCA, Consumer Direct, Trading Standards, Local Environmental health Department, Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs or Animal Health Office.

Adoption

Adopting a dog instead of buying one is a good way to strike a blow against puppy farms. Animal shelters have dozens of dogs just waiting for homes.

Litter

Are they even sized, bright and lively. Are there any signs of ill health? If you see various breeds of dogs and puppies all in the same house, with multiple litters of different breeds this should make you suspicious. Generally, responsible breeders will have one litter at a time.

Please remember, if you have any concerns about getting a new dog in the future, we are always here to help. Simply call the Surgery to speak to myself or any other member of the team; together, we really can make a difference.

Detailed points to remember when buying a puppy

Find a responsible breeder and visit their premises. Responsible breeders provide a loving and healthy environment for their canine companions, one that they will be proud to show you. If they are genuine loving breeders of dogs, then they should be interviewing YOU to check you are a fit person to be looking after one of their “babies”.

Don’t be swayed by a good looking website or advert. Just because a website says great things about their “home raised” or “family raised” puppies doesn’t make it true. Many puppy farmers pose as small family breeders online and in newspaper and magazine ads.

You should always see a puppy with its mother in the place where the puppy was bred. Ideally you should see the father too, or at least a photo of him. If the breeder cannot show you the mother or father, you should be suspicious.

  • Look at the litter - are they even sized, bright and lively. Are there any signs of ill health?
  • Look at the environment – is it clean, and are the dogs well tended to with food and water?
  • Look at the behaviour of the bitch and any other dogs around. Are they well socialised?

If you see various breeds of dogs and puppies all in the same house, with multiple litters of different breeds this should make you suspicious. Generally, responsible breeders will have one litter at a time.

Get as much information as possible about where the puppy has come from, and beware if the breeder is from outside the UK.

Has the puppy REALLY been vaccinated? If you are told the puppy has been vaccinated, ask to see the vaccination card. Beware that vaccination cards are sometimes easy to fake - if the veterinary surgeon’s contact details are not visible or has an address from outside the UK, the card may be fake.

Pedigree certificates are not a guarantee. Bear in mind that pedigree certificates are not a guarantee for the condition of your puppy and may not even mean you are being sold a pure-bred dog.

Always see a puppy in the place it was bred. Don’t ever buy from someone who offers to deliver your puppy or who arranges to meet you somewhere.

Avoid the temptation to “rescue” a farmed puppy by buying him. Even though your intentions may be good, don’t buy a puppy with the idea that you are “rescuing” him or her. Your “rescue” opens up space for another farmed puppy and puts money into the pockets of the puppy farm industry. The money you spend on your puppy goes right back to the puppy farm operator and ensures they will continue breeding and treating dogs inhumanely. If you see someone keeping puppies in poor conditions, alert your local animal control authorities. If you are concerned about the health or welfare of a puppy, contact the RSPCA 24-hour cruelty and advice line: 0300 1234 999.

If you are concerned about how you were sold the puppy, contact Consumer Direct 08454 04 05 06 or the local authority responsible for the area you bought it from (details can be found in the phone book or on the internet). If you suspect the puppy may have come from abroad and does not have a Pet Passport it may be in contravention of UK anti-rabies legislation. Please contact either Trading Standards or Environmental health services at your local authority (depending on where you live). Alternatively you can report the matter to your nearest Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Animal Health Office.

Lastly, consider adoption. Adopting a dog instead of buying one is a good way to strike a blow against puppy farms. To find the perfect match, you’ll want to choose the right one for you and your lifestyle. Animal shelters have dozens of dogs just waiting for homes. There are also breed specific rescue groups for every breed of dog. Crossbreed dogs make wonderful pets and are often much healthier than their purebred cousins.

Don’t forget if you are concerned about the health or welfare of a puppy, contact the RSPCA 24-hour cruelty and advice line: 0300 1234 999.

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